Clean Energy Solutions

Clean Energy Solutions

Court denies attempt by Gov. Martinez and PNM to stall pollution controls for coal-burning plant

SJGS © WildEarth Guardians

March 1 - DENVER – A federal court ruled today that PNM must comply with a decision last fall requiring the utility to install pollution controls to significantly cut the 16,000 tons a year of harmful haze, ozone, and fine particle-producing nitrogen pollution that pours from the smokestacks each year at the San Juan Generating Station near Farmington, N.M.


PNM rate increases fuel soaring profits

SJGS © WildEarth Guardians

New Report Finds New Mexico Utility PNM Used Huge Rate Hikes
on Residents to Fuel Soaring Profits During Recession

Little spent toward clean energy or efficiency for New Mexicans

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - February 28, 2012 - The Sierra Club, New Energy Economy, San Juan Citizens Alliance, Diné CARE, and Southwest Organizing Project released a report today finding that New Mexico’s largest utility, the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM), has aggressively pursued major increases in electricity rates, corporate profits, and executive pay during a period of economic hardship for many residents.


Stronger, better-funded energy-efficiency programs needed

Green Building Code in Santa Fe Approved

Published February 19 in Santa Fe New Mexican and on February 25 in the Albuquerque Journal

We have all seen our Public Service Company of New Mexico electricity rates increase over the past few years. From April 2008 to today, PNM rates for the average residential customer has increased by 41 percent or $250 per year.

Where is all of this money going? More of it should be coming right back to you and other customers in the form of PNM information and rebates to lower your costs for energy-efficient light bulbs, appliances, weatherization and insulation. But currently most of it is going to keep PNM's aging coal plants running and hooking up more energy-guzzling housing subdivisions.

Why should you care? Because energy efficiency is the cheapest way to satisfy New Mexico's electricity demand, by a significant margin. PNM's 2010 annual report on energy efficiency states that the average cost to save a kilowatt hour of electrical energy is 1.86 cents. Compare that to the 11 cents per kWh paid by the average residential user.


The Sierra Club and Natural Gas

02/02/2012 From Michael Brune, Executive Director

Have you ever had to turn away millions of dollars? It sounds crazy, but here's why the Sierra Club chose to do exactly that.

In 2010, soon after I became the organization's executive director, I learned that beginning in 2007 the Sierra Club had received more than $26 million from individuals or subsidiaries of Chesapeake Energy, one of the country's largest natural gas companies. At the same time I learned about the donation, we at the Club were also hearing from scientists and from local Club chapters about the risks that natural gas drilling posed to our air, water, climate, and people in their communities. We cannot accept money from an industry we need to change. Very quickly, the board of directors, with my strong encouragement, cut off these donations and rewrote our gift acceptance policy. Let me tell you how it came about.


Club supports Carbon Cap for New Mexico

EarthinHands

November 17 - The Sierra Club supports the existing carbon cap regulation that was passed by the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board (EIB) in 2010. The Club filed its entry of appearance with the EIB today.

Governor Martinez made campaign promises to eliminate these safeguards and she started by firing the old EIB in her first week on the job. She replaced them with people who are portrayed as business friendly, but they are truly anti-people, as they do not support environment improvement as the name of the board would indicate.


Sustainable Eldorado Residents Alliance

SERA1

WHAT IS SERA?

We are a large group of committed Eldorado area residents forming an ecological partnership with our environment by conserving natural resources and inspiring action to ensure a sustainable and resilient future for our community.


Albuquerque institutions go solar

AlbqAcademy1-1mWPVarray_2.jpg

By Jeff Potter

Recent projections by the University of New Mexico Bureau of Business and Economic Research for population growth in central New Mexico are eye-opening. By the year 2035 there will be another Bernalillo County-size increase in the population along the Rio Grande corridor. These projections lead to concerns such as water availability, infrastructure limitations, and residential and business electricity supply.


PNM’s Integrated Resource Plan – Expect More Large Electricity Rate Increases

Wind turbines

The CCAE protest of the NM IRP was filed on August 17. The complete document is attached to this webpage

July 18 - “PNM’s Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) continues the same strategies that have caused the huge rate increases realized by PNM customers. PNM has already raised rates by 25% in recent years and is currently asking the Public Regulation Commission (PRC) for another 20% rate increase, bringing the total to 50% (1.25 x 1.20 = 1.50) in just a few years. At the same time, PNM is not doing nearly enough to mitigate future rate increases driven by its continued investment in old, dirty fossil-fuel power plants. New Mexicans would be better served by a more much aggressive implementation of energy efficiency and clean renewable energy.” Don Hancock, Chairman of the Coalition for Clean Affordable Energy, said Monday.


Healthy Air is Healthy for Our Economy

Solar PV - by DVW

Published on August 12 in the ABQ Journal with the title "Don't Believe PNM Lie: EPA Will Save Lives"

Published on August 14 in the Santa Fe New Mexican with the title "Clean air is healthy for our economy"

By David Van Winkle and Adella Begaye

Labored breathing, coughing, burning lungs. If you’ve done outdoor activity on a hot day with bad air quality, you may know the feeling. For a child with asthma, those high-smog days can bring on suffocating attacks. For someone with respiratory or cardiovascular problems, they can be fatal.

That’s why the recent news is so welcome that one of our region’s biggest air polluters – the San Juan Generating Station – will have to dramatically reduce its emissions. On Friday, Aug. 5, the EPA announced that it will require the nearly 40-year-old coal-burning power plant near Farmington to cut its nitrogen oxide emissions by more than 80 percent.


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