Climate Change

Climate Change and Global Warming

Clean Energy Solutions

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Clean Energy News

The Rio Grande Chapter of the Sierra Club is focused on energy issues that have a direct impact on climate change, air pollution, and the green economy. These activities are part of the national Sierra Club priorities “Beyond Coal,” “Clean Energy Solutions,” and “Federal and International Climate Campaign.”


Cool Cities Campaign

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Cool Cities News

The Sierra Club’s Cool Cities Campaign works with cities that have joined the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement to accelerate their implementation of effective programs.

To date, more than 1000 mayors nationwide have signed the agreement. In New Mexico, seven cities are participating in the program: Alamogordo, Albuquerque, Capitan, Las Cruces, Ruidoso, Santa Fe (City and County), and Taos. Under the agreement, participating cities commit to take the following three actions:


Pipeline for carbon dioxide needs a closer look

Paradox Gas Well

By Denise Fort, Chapter Energy Chair

Mine CO2 and build a pipeline to carry it? Seriously?

Thanks to a call from a citizen, we were alerted that the Bureau of Land Management is considering approval of a pipeline to carry carbon dioxide from a mine in Arizona to the Permian Basin oil developments in Eastern New Mexico.
The project is described here.


Sierra Club statement on PRC’s Dec. 18 ruling on renewable energy

For Immediate Release: Dec. 18, 2013

Sierra Club statement on PRC’s Wednesday ruling on renewable energy

Santa Fe, NM - Solar energy and clean air got a reprieve Wednesday when the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission voted to withdraw 2-for-1 credit for solar energy, which had effectively reduced the amount of solar and overall renewable energy New Mexico utilities were required by law to produce. But Wednesday’s vote left some troubling aspects of the previous commission ruling.


Supporters of renewable energy pack PRC meeting

By Mona Blaber
Communications director
It isn’t often that the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission holds its meetings in front of more than a few lawyers, staff and representativs of regulated companies.
But on Sept. 10, when commissioners took public comments on changes to an important rule that implements New Mexico’s Renewable Energy Act, supporters of clean energy showed up in such large numbers that the hearing had to be moved to a larger auditorium.


Will Chaco fall victim to Mancos play?

By Norma McCallan, Northern New Mexico co-chair

In a remote area of the southeastern San Juan Basin, down a long, washboard dirt road, lies Chaco Culture National Historical Park. Designated as a World Heritage Site in 1987, its magnificent ancient ruins face a new threat from proposed federal gas and oil leases north and east of the park, totaling 18,500 acres.


Sierra Club Rio Grande Chapter statement on President Obama’s Climate Plan and New Mexico

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For immediate release: June 25, 2013 Contact: Camilla Feibelman, Rio Grande Chapter director, camilla.feibelman@sierraclub.org, 505-715-8388

See attachment for printable PDF file


Sierra Club activists put heat on Martinez, PRC

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By Shrayas Jatkar
Beyond Coal organizing representative

Many things led to the acknowledgement by PNM and the Martinez administration that coal is the fuel of the past.

Without the constant public pressure exerted by Rio Grande Chapter members and friends, the decision to reduce the deadly coal pollution at San Juan Generating Station simply would not have happened.

New Mexico’s Beyond Coal to Clean Energy campaign included national program staff, local volunteers, and diverse partner groups.


Deal would reduce millions of tons of carbon dioxide, but where’s the renewable energy?

Coal - San Juan

By Shrayas Jatkar
Beyond Coal organizing representative

The state of New Mexico and PNM announced that they had struck a major deal with the Environmental Protection Agency on Feb. 15 regarding the future of the San Juan Generating Station, a 40-year-old coal-burning power plant near Farmington. Key elements of the deal are to close two of the four coal-burning units by the end of 2017 while putting pollution controls on the remaining two units to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxide and other toxic pollutants.


Sierra Club reaction on new state plan on San Juan coal plant

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The state of New Mexico and PNM announced Friday afternoon that they had struck a deal with the EPA to close units 2 and 3 of the four-unit San Juan coal plant and put pollution controls that are less expensive but less effective on the remaining two units to reduce nitrogen oxide. Below is the Sierra Club's response.

Thousands of activists have joined our campaign transition away from coal at San Juan and everywhere to protect our children from health-damaging pollution and disastrous climate consequences. If this deal goes through, you have succeeded in shutting down nearly 900 megawatts of coal -- enough to power 900,000 homes. No jobs will be lost, and PNM will invest at least $1 million into the Four Corners area for economic development.

However, the deal specifies only natural gas as a replacement power, not renewables or efficiency. The Sierra Club will continue to work to clean up the air in the Four Corners area and across the country.


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