Energy

New Mexico can afford to clean up its act on oil and gas drilling

Rio Grande Chapter Energy Team chair Denise Fort and team member Verne Loose, an energy economist, did a study of the economics of oil and gas drilling in New Mexico and found that, despite common claims from industry, New Mexico's oil and gas companies are not generally smaller or less able to operate under common-sense regulations like the "Pit Rule" that safeguard our water and air from contamination.

The paper is attached here:


PNM Plans to Waste Tens of Billions of Gallons of Water by Burning Fossil Fuels

For Immediate Release: June 25, 2014
Contact: Jim Mackenzie -350 New Mexico, 505 350-6000
    David Robertson, Sierra Club – Rio Grande Chapter, 505-803-6242

Albuquerque, NM --- The Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) is squandering a chance to save tens of billions of gallons of water through the year 2033 by investing in large-scale, cost-effective renewable energy. PNM is instead planning to use mostly nuclear, coal, and natural gas, all highly water intensive, to replace the power from two soon to be shuttered stacks at the San Juan Generating Stations in northwestern New Mexico. The Rio Grande Chapter of the Sierra Club and 350 New Mexico issued its “PNM Water You Thinking Report” today detailing PNM's plan to unnecessarily consume large amounts of water in power production, which the utility described in their December filing to the Public Regulation Commission (PRC).


PRC approves damaging changes to renewables rule

Solar - City of Santa Fe - 1 MW © DVW

For Immediate Release:
April 16, 2014

Rio Grande Chapter statement on PRC decision to make damaging change to cost calculations in renewables rule

SANTA FE, NM - The Public Regulation Commission on Wednesday voted to make a damaging change to the rule that enforces New Mexico’s renewable-energy law.

Counsel Rick Blumenfeld deceptively told the commission that his recommendation addressed concerns of commenters and failed to tell the commission that most commenters had reached a consensus to keep the current rule intact.


Clean Energy Solutions

Solar PV - by DVW

Clean Energy News

The Rio Grande Chapter of the Sierra Club is focused on energy issues that have a direct impact on climate change, air pollution, and the green economy. These activities are part of the national Sierra Club priorities “Beyond Coal,” “Clean Energy Solutions,” and “Federal and International Climate Campaign.”


Cool Cities Campaign

Solar Thermal Panels by DVW

Cool Cities News

The Sierra Club’s Cool Cities Campaign works with cities that have joined the U.S. Mayors Climate Protection Agreement to accelerate their implementation of effective programs.

To date, more than 1000 mayors nationwide have signed the agreement. In New Mexico, seven cities are participating in the program: Alamogordo, Albuquerque, Capitan, Las Cruces, Ruidoso, Santa Fe (City and County), and Taos. Under the agreement, participating cities commit to take the following three actions:


New Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production

Rio Grande Chapter Energy Team chair Denise Fort and team member Verne Loose, an energy economist, did a study of the economics of oil and gas drilling in New Mexico and found that, despite common claims from industry, New Mexico's oil and gas companies are not generally smaller or less able to operate under common-sense regulations like the "Pit Rule" that safeguard our water and air from contamination.

To read the paper, click here:


Coal not going without a fight

Coal Plant - Inflatable

By Nellis Kennedy Howard, Beyond Coal Senior Campaign Representative

Both of New Mexico’s coal plants will soon be burning a lot less of that polluting fuel, thanks to EPA safeguards and the efforts of groups like ours. But utilities and other players continue to double down on this losing hand. Here’s an update on where coal in New Mexico stands:

San Juan Generating Station


Roller coaster for renewables

Solar Roof Top

By Mona Blaber, communications coordinator

Renewable energy’s wild ride started in January, with a move by industry players to reverse the renewable-energy rule that New Mexico’s Public Regulation Commission had just passed in December 2012.

New Mexico Industrial Energy Consumers and other anti-renewables forces moved in just days after Commissioners Jason Marks and Doug Howe, who had worked to hold utilities accountable for complying with the state Renewable Energy Act, left office.

The saga of the important but complex renewables rule has lasted all year.


Supporters of renewable energy pack PRC meeting

By Mona Blaber
Communications director
It isn’t often that the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission holds its meetings in front of more than a few lawyers, staff and representativs of regulated companies.
But on Sept. 10, when commissioners took public comments on changes to an important rule that implements New Mexico’s Renewable Energy Act, supporters of clean energy showed up in such large numbers that the hearing had to be moved to a larger auditorium.


Supporters of renewable energy pack PRC hearing

photo by Susan Martin

New Mexicans ask commission to support strong rule to enforce renewables requirements

By Mona Blaber, Communications director

It isn’t often that the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission holds its meetings in front of more than a few lawyers, staff and representatives of regulated companies. But on Sept. 10, when commissioners took public
comments on changes to an important rule that implements New Mexico’s Renewable Energy Act, supporters of clean energy showed up in such large
numbers that the hearing had to be moved to a larger auditorium.


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