Rio Grande Sierran Newsletter

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Click the links below to download the Rio Grande Sierran newsletter .pdf's


Chair's message: Fraser was longtime chapter leader, conservationist

Rio Grande Chapter chair John Buchser

By John Buchser, Rio Grande Chapter chair, 03/24/14
Former Northern Group and Chapter chair Doug Fraser passed away unexpectedly earlier this year. I still remember him calling me before every Group executive committee meeting and cheerfully reminding me to come and share with the group. Doug was a warm and enthusiastic leader.


Water Sentinels prepare for monitoring

Annouk

By Eric Patterson, Water Sentinels-Rios de Taos, 03/24/14
Water Sentinels­ is preparing for a new water-monitoring season. There will be a training session in Valdez on May 15 to prepare for our first monitoring of this season on May 19.
We will be paying more attention to the upper Rio Hondo this year because the new owners of Taos Ski Valley have quite a bit of construction planned. The effluent from Taos Ski Valley has been pristine over the last few years, and we, along with the new owners, would like to keep it that way.


NM Volunteers for Outdoors Work Day - February 22, 2014 -Restore habitat for the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

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Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge is one of the largest refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System in the lower 48 states. The 230,000 acre refuge includes four different biomes that intersect and support a wide array of biological diversity. The Rio Grande flows through the center of the refuge and is an importance source of water that creates an oasis for wildlife in the arid landscape.

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New Mexico water policies

Rio Grande Bosque Canal

By Denise Fort, Mike Agar and John Buchser

Introduction
In general New Mexico water policies have been far too focused on the development of the state’s water resources, without regard to the sustainability of water uses, or the effect on the natural environment of these withdrawals. Now, as climate change ushers in higher temperatures, less predictability in precipitation, and reduced flows in our rivers, we are ill prepared to meet the challenge of adjusting to these changes. Further, our widespread reliance on mined groundwater means that the gap between supplies and our accustomed uses will increase as aquifers are mined.

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NEW DATE - March 20 - Proposed La Bajada Mesa strip mine public hearing

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UPDATE: The Case Manager Jose Larrañaga has postponed the Buena Vista / Rockology hearing before the County Development Review Committee (CDRC) until next month, Thursday, March 20.

On March 20th the proposed plan will be heard by the Santa Fe County - see attached poster.

PLEASE COME TO THE HEARING AND EMAIL the Case Manager, Jose Larrañaga :
Dear Mr. Larrañaga, we do not support mining in this location because :


Crawford Symposium - Feb. 25 - ABQ

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2014 Crawford Symposium ~ Green Trails for the Next Generation ~

What: A gathering and celebration to share our research and ideas about the New Mexico bosque and landscape we cherish. This is an event for high school school & college students, professionals and the community to promote information sharing, networking and action to help create a sustainable future!

Date: Tuesday, February 25th 2014

Location: Bosque School ~ Budagher Hall, 4000 Learning Road NW, Albuquerque, NM 87120


Richard Barish interview by VB Price on Rio Grande Vision plan

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The conversation offers objective insights into the Bosque issues and the Rio Grande Vision plan in a comprehensive manner.

V.B. Price talks with Richard Barish, the Bosque Issues chair for the Sierra Club Rio Grande Chapter, about how Albuquerque Mayor Richard Berry's Rio Grande Vision plan will impact the Bosque.

New Mexico Mercury

YouTube link


Westerners pack the room for wolves

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By Mary Katherine Ray, Chapter Wildlife Chair

With the government back in business after its October shutdown, all of U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s public hearings on its rule proposals for wolf management have been held. One was in Washington DC before the shutdown, afterwards there was one in Denver, Sacramento, Albuquerque and Pinetop, Ariz. The last two also allowed testimony about the proposed Mexican Wolf rule changes in addition to the delisting all other wolves from Endangered Species protection.


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