Sustainability

Sustainability

Reduce, reuse, revolutionize

Trash

By Jessie Emerson, Northern Group Recycling Chair

According to the World Resources Institute (2000), global energy consumption and manufacturing activity over the next 50 years may rise to three times current levels.


State water plan being updated

NM basins BW.jpg

By Sig Silber, Northern New Mexico Group Water Chair

In 2003 the first New Mexico State Water Plan was adopted. It is the intent of the Legislature that the Interstate Stream Commission, in collaboration with the Office of the State Engineer and the water trust board, prepare and implement a comprehensive state water plan. The state water plan shall be a strategic management tool.

The details of the water-planning statute can be viewed at

  • click here

  • Wildlife management or wildlife destruction?

    Protest at NM Game & Fish Dept. - photo by MK Ray

    On June 21, the state Game Commission rubber-stamped Game and Fish’s
    recommendation to drastically increase allowed bear and cougar kills in New Mexico.

    By Mary Katherine Ray, Wildlife Chair

    What exactly is meant when the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish uses the words “wildlife management”? When it comes to carnivores, it means one thing: killing. Game and Fish is proposing to increase the number of bears being killed despite only two years having passed since the quotas were raised dramatically already.


    Flow Restored to the Santa Fe River

    Santa Fe River - JB

    By John Buchser, Chapter Chair and River Commission member, a.k.a. River Angel

    Years of work by river commissioners and Santa Fe City staff was rewarded on February 29 by unanimous approval of a river flow bill by the City Council. The bill allows for 'pass-through' of flows through the two reservoirs above Santa Fe of up to 1000 acre-feet of water in a year-round scheme designed to mirror natural flows.


    Stronger, better-funded energy-efficiency programs needed

    Green Building Code in Santa Fe Approved

    Published February 19 in Santa Fe New Mexican and on February 25 in the Albuquerque Journal

    We have all seen our Public Service Company of New Mexico electricity rates increase over the past few years. From April 2008 to today, PNM rates for the average residential customer has increased by 41 percent or $250 per year.

    Where is all of this money going? More of it should be coming right back to you and other customers in the form of PNM information and rebates to lower your costs for energy-efficient light bulbs, appliances, weatherization and insulation. But currently most of it is going to keep PNM's aging coal plants running and hooking up more energy-guzzling housing subdivisions.

    Why should you care? Because energy efficiency is the cheapest way to satisfy New Mexico's electricity demand, by a significant margin. PNM's 2010 annual report on energy efficiency states that the average cost to save a kilowatt hour of electrical energy is 1.86 cents. Compare that to the 11 cents per kWh paid by the average residential user.


    Santa Fe River Is Not A River Without Water

    Santa Fe River Mural

    Published February 19 in the Santa Fe New Mexican

    On February 29, Santa Fe City Council voted unanimously to support up to 1000 Acre-Feet/year to flow in the Santa Fe River. The City of Santa Fe has reached a major milestone in its 400 year history - water once again in the River!

    Having served on the River Commission for two terms, John Buchser happily accepted the new title 'river angel' from councilor Bushee.

    On Wednesday, February 29, at 7pm, the Santa Fe City Council is considering a river flow ordinance. This law would allow year-round flow past our reservoirs into the Santa Fe River. The River through Santa Fe is why our City has existed 400 years. A river does not exist as a living river without water. You can do two things to show support for water in the river.

    • Write or call your councilors and let them know you support flow in the river, and why. The e-mail and phone number for each councilor is shown at the end of this webpage.
    • Come to the council meeting on the last day of February and tell the council in person why you support flow in the river.

    The Sierra Club and Natural Gas

    02/02/2012 From Michael Brune, Executive Director

    Have you ever had to turn away millions of dollars? It sounds crazy, but here's why the Sierra Club chose to do exactly that.

    In 2010, soon after I became the organization's executive director, I learned that beginning in 2007 the Sierra Club had received more than $26 million from individuals or subsidiaries of Chesapeake Energy, one of the country's largest natural gas companies. At the same time I learned about the donation, we at the Club were also hearing from scientists and from local Club chapters about the risks that natural gas drilling posed to our air, water, climate, and people in their communities. We cannot accept money from an industry we need to change. Very quickly, the board of directors, with my strong encouragement, cut off these donations and rewrote our gift acceptance policy. Let me tell you how it came about.


    Hard-won victory on dairy discharge

    By Dan Lorimier, Conservation coordinator, Southern and El Paso groups

    After roughly two and a half years of effort, the Rio Grande Chapter has successfully helped protect New Mexico’s precious but highly threatened groundwater that 9 out of 10 of us rely on for drinking.


    Sustainable Eldorado Residents Alliance

    SERA1

    WHAT IS SERA?

    We are a large group of committed Eldorado area residents forming an ecological partnership with our environment by conserving natural resources and inspiring action to ensure a sustainable and resilient future for our community.


    Water-saving successes in El Paso and Santa Fe

    Rainwater Harvesting System (photo by Janet Thew)

    By Mike Weinberg, Chapter Water Chair

    We all by now have heard that worldwide shortages of fresh water are expected in the coming decades due to increased demand from an ever-growing global population and anticipated drying of the earth’s climate.

    Development of new water supplies and better management of existing sources will be necessary in order to meet the challenges that lie ahead. We can all help by conserving this precious resource.


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