Press Room

EPA, Sierra Club Spar with PNM Over Pollution Control Costs

Public News Service Press Release

December 30, 2010 - FARMINGTON, N.M. - It's a debate over numbers when it comes to cleaning up the emissions from New Mexico's biggest power plant, and both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Rio Grande Chapter of the Sierra Club say figures put out by power utility PNM are way off. The utility says it could cost a billion dollars to install the pollution controls proposed by the EPA for the San Juan Generating Station, New Mexico's biggest power plant.

That could mean an increase in electric bills of about $90 per year for each household, but David Van Winkle, energy chairman of the Sierra Club Rio Grande Chapter, says that, using EPA estimates and some simple math, the figure is closer to $10 a year.


EPA Proposal Would Protect Air Quality in New Mexico and Neighbor States

Coal - San Juan

Tribal and Conservation Organizations Applaud Limits on Dangerous Pollution from San Juan Generating Station

(NEW MEXICO)— The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released a proposed rule to control dangerous air pollution from the coal-fired San Juan Generating Station in New Mexico. The rule specifically addresses pollutants that form ozone and small particles, both of which are very harmful to the public’s health as well as visibility throughout the region. Children, the elderly, people with lung diseases such as asthma, and people who work or exercise outside are at risk for adverse effects from ozone and particulate matter. Tribal and conservation organizations, including Dooda (No) Desert Rock and the Sierra Club applauded the EPA effort to protect people from the pollution created by the San Juan Generating Station.


NM Water Quality Commission Approves Safeguards for Clean Water

December 15 – The New Mexico Water Quality Control Commission (WQCC) today passed New Mexico’s first industry-specific regulations for the dairy industry. The new regulations will govern dairy waste pollution in ground water. The decision marks the end of a two-year process begun by the dairy industry itself, which asked for industry-specific regulations during the 2009 New Mexico legislative session.

“These regulations are way overdue”, said Jerry Nivens of Caballo Concerned Citizens. “This is a victory for clean water.”


Sierra Club Applauds Decision to Uphold New Mexico Clean Air Protections

Helena Chemical Company Must Continue to Meet Air Quality Standards

December 6- The Sierra Club applauded the New Mexico Environmental Improvement Board (EIB) ruling today that Helena Chemical Company’s facility in Mesquite, New Mexico must continue to operate with an air quality permit.


Sorry, PNM: Customer cost for clean air likely to be $10 per year, not $90

Coal - San Juan

12/24/10 - PNM claims that it would cost PNM residential customers $90/year for 20 years to implement the recently announced EPA proposed pollution controls for the coal-fired San Juan Generating Station (SJGS), located in Farmington New Mexico. PNM also claims that these pollution controls capital cost would exceed $1 Billion.

Both claims are significantly overstated.


Club Leads Effort to Regulate Coal Combustion Waste in NM

Coal Waste

Update 12/2- Members from 15 nation-wide organizations, including the Sierra Club, have sent more than 250,000 letters to the EPA in support of strong controls on Coal Combustion Waste.

Santa Fe – August 6 - Speaking through 13 of New Mexico’s most representative advocacy groups, New Mexicans are asking Governor Richardson to support strong, Federal regulation of Coal Combustion Waste (CCW). New Mexico ranks 10th in the nation for CCW production with an amazing 6.8 million tons dumped from coal fired electric power generation in San Juan and McKinley Counties annually.


Proposed EPA Rule Will Protect People from Dangerous Air Pollution at Dirty Four Corners Plant

Coal - San Juan

(NEW MEXICO)— The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released a proposed rule on how to control dangerous air pollution from the coal-fired Four Corners Power Plant, which is located on Navajo Nation land near Farmington, New Mexico. The rule specifically addresses nitrogen oxide (NOx) pollution, which reacts with other chemicals to form ozone and small particles, both of which are very harmful to the public’s health.


Publications

Hiking Book, 7th edition

Books for Sale:
Day Hikes in the Santa Fe Area, 7th Edition
by the Northern New Mexico Group of the Sierra Club

$16.95

For more information about Day Hikes in the Santa Fe Area please email: Dag Ryen, dryen@heliconwest.com, or call Dag at 505-466-4063


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