Trapping

Trapping Reform in New Mexico

Legtrap © M.K. Ray

Most people are astonished to learn that trapping is still a legal activity in New Mexico. Because fur prices are high now due to demand from fashion houses not only in North America and Europe, but also in Asia, the amount of trapping going on in New Mexico is higher than it has been in years.

Watch this video to see that New Mexicans from many walks of life oppose trapping on public lands.


Trap Free New Mexico

Trap Free Zia Poster

We need your help to show the faces that support a trap-free New Mexico. Be part of our video montage by downloading and printing the trap-free poster (or make your own) and fill in the blank with words that describe YOU! Then take your picture holding the sign and email it back to Mary Katherine Ray at mkrscrim@kitcarson.net.

Let your voices be heard- and your faces- be seen! In the spirit of the season, gather the kids, the dogs the horses and everyone and create your trap-free NM identity today! The printable poster is attached and can be downloaded.

Watch this video to see that New Mexicans from many walks of life oppose trapping on public lands.

See even more New Mexicans from many walks of life opposing trapping on public lands.


Westerners pack the room for wolves

FWSWolfHearing-photobyJan Maguire.jpg

By Mary Katherine Ray, Chapter Wildlife Chair

With the government back in business after its October shutdown, all of U.S. Fish and Wildlife’s public hearings on its rule proposals for wolf management have been held. One was in Washington DC before the shutdown, afterwards there was one in Denver, Sacramento, Albuquerque and Pinetop, Ariz. The last two also allowed testimony about the proposed Mexican Wolf rule changes in addition to the delisting all other wolves from Endangered Species protection.


Sticking up for the Mexican gray wolf

Aurelia Valente.jpg

By Mary Katherine Ray
Chapter Wildlife chair

Aurelia Valente recently wrote her own op-ed for The Santa Fe New Mexican defending protection of Mexican gray wolves after the executive director of New Mexico Cattle Growers said wolves “haven’t proven to be able to live in the wild.” I talked to this 13-year-old Santa Fe wildlife enthusiast about what motivated her to speak out:

Mary Katherine Ray: How did you become interested in New Mexico’s wolves?


Introduced Legislative Memorials would have monitored Game & Fish Dept.

By Mary Katherine Ray
Chapter Wildlife chair

Rep. Jeff Steinborn of Las Cruces, who sits on the House Energy and Natural Resources Committee, heard the testimony on HB579, the bill to ban trapping on public land, and afterward introduced two memorials that would have provided needed oversight of New Mexico Game and Fish Department.


How to save your pets from traps

By Mary Katherine Ray, Chapter Wildlife Chair

Trapping season began in New Mexico on November 1 and will not end until March 15. This is the season when fur is its thickest and most valuable, so trappers are out to make a profit by killing wildlife such as bobcats, foxes, coyotes and badgers.

They can set their traps on public lands where the rest of us go to enjoy these same animals and their habitats. No warning signs are required, and the distance a trap can be set from roads and trails is a mere 25 yards. How much trapping occurs depends on current fur prices. The more money pelts are bringing, the more traps there will be.
In order to protect your dog and yourself while hiking, please take a look at these photos of traps that could be encountered and note how to open them if your dog is caught.


Under Fire: Public, elected officials respond passionately to coyote-killing contest

Coyote Killing Protest photo by Karen Hackney

By Mary Katherine Ray, Chapter Wildlife Chair

Coyotes, our native wild song dogs, are the most persecuted animal in New Mexico. They can be shot on sight, trapped or poisoned all year long in unlimited numbers. And now we know that shooters compete with each other in organized events to see who can kill the most in a weekend to win a prize.


Conservation Organizations Petition Feds for Protection for Relocated Prairie Dogs

Relocation Site at El Malpais National Conservation Area Allows Recreational Shooting


Wildlife management or wildlife destruction?

Protest at NM Game & Fish Dept. - photo by MK Ray

On June 21, the state Game Commission rubber-stamped Game and Fish’s
recommendation to drastically increase allowed bear and cougar kills in New Mexico.

By Mary Katherine Ray, Wildlife Chair

What exactly is meant when the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish uses the words “wildlife management”? When it comes to carnivores, it means one thing: killing. Game and Fish is proposing to increase the number of bears being killed despite only two years having passed since the quotas were raised dramatically already.


So-so year for wolves; otters get second look

Wolf2 © 2006 Larry Allen

By Mary Katherine Ray, Wildlife Chair

Wolves
The wolf population count for 2011 is in. Despite nine known Mexican wolf deaths last year and the fires and the drought, 2011 was not a bad year for wolves. The official count is up to 58, which is eight more in the wild than at the end of 2010. Arizona has 32 and New Mexico 26.


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